Giant Australian Reef

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Giant reef found in northern Australia, according to a report in New Scientist, 30 April 2005, p6. Researchers from Geoscience Australia on a survey ship have found a huge, previously unnoticed patch of coral reefs covering over 80 square kilometres in the Gulf of Carpentaria, with a long 100 km platform reef extending westward from Mornington Island. It would seem a mystery that such an enormous structure hadn't already been found, but most known coral reefs are less than 20m below the surface. If they are deeper than this they will not be picked up by remote sensing satellites, and if they are not under a regular shipping lane they will not be found because no-one goes looking for them, except in specialist surveys such as the Geoscience Australia one. The newly found reef is between 20 and 30 metres below the surface. Peter Harris who led the survey said that coral reefs would have flourished in the past "when sea levels were typically 30 to 50 metres lower than today".

Editorial Comment: If the oceans were 30 to 50 metres below current levels, many islands and continents that are now separated would be joined, and migrating humans and animals would have been able to spread across the world without having to cross vast expanses of oceans. These sea level changes would have facilitated the scattering of peoples as they spread out after the judgement at the Tower of Babel. When the sea levels rose again, probably due to the melting of the ice which is mentioned in the book of Job, the people were "trapped" in new lands until they developed seagoing vessels. However, God had achieved what He forced the people to do at Babel - spread out and fill the earth. (Ref. oceanography, sea-levels, reefs)

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