Quote: Darwin on Man and Monkeys

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Darwin on Man and Monkeys:  Nine months before he died Darwin wrote about his views on mankind:

“But then with me the horrid doubt always arises whether the convictions of man's mind, which has been developed from the mind of the lower animals, are of any value or at all trustworthy. Would any one trust in the convictions of a monkey's mind, if there are any convictions in such a mind?”

Letter to William Graham, 3 July 1881.

Editorial Comment: By the end of his life Darwin is convinced man is just another animal that came into existence by the long and naturalistic struggle for survival. Therefore, he reasons our thoughts are no more significant than those of the monkey-like creatures he believes we came from. This is in direct opposition to God’s description of man being such a separate unique creation, made in the image of God that we can share our thoughts with our Creator and our fellow human beings. (Ref. theistic evolution, Scriptures Genesis, philosophy, world-view)

Evidence News, 16 December 2009

Charles Darwin was a bright young theological graduate, but by the end of his life he had turned his back on God, denied that Jesus Christ was the Son of God and declared Scripture to be "manifestly false". What happened?
Read the Creation Research article The Descent of a Man. PDF here

Darwin’s letters are available from the Darwin Correspondence Project

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