Quote: Darwin’s Grand View of Life

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Darwin’s grand view of life. The final paragraph of the first edition of Darwin’s Origin of Species, (1859) sums up his view of how all living things came into being:

“It is interesting to contemplate an entangled bank, clothed with many plants of many kinds, with birds singing on the bushes, with various insects flitting about, and with worms crawling through the damp earth, and to reflect that these elaborately constructed forms, so different from each other, and dependent on each other in so complex a manner, have all been produced by laws acting around us. These laws, taken in the largest sense, being Growth with Reproduction; Inheritance which is almost implied by reproduction; Variability from the indirect and direct action of the external conditions of life, and from use and disuse; a Ratio of Increase so high as to lead to a Struggle for Life, and as a consequence to Natural Selection, entailing Divergence of Character and the Extinction of less-improved forms.

Thus, from the war of nature, from famine and death, the most exalted object which we are capable of conceiving, namely, the production of the higher animals, directly follows. There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.”

Darwin, C. R. 1859. On the origin of species by means of natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life. London: John Murray. [1st edition] pp490-491

Editorial Comment: An endless struggle for life, resulting in famine, death and extinction has only the deluded grandeur of a Stalinist war on the masses and is the exact opposite of God’s assessment of His finished creation: “And God saw everything that he had made, and, behold, it was very good”. (Genesis 1:31) Genesis 1 and 2 describe a world of beauty and perfection where there was neither famine, nor struggle, suffering nor death. What God considered ‘good’ is confirmed by looking at the life of Jesus Christ, who as the Creator incarnate “went about doing good” (Acts 10:38) which covered Jesus feeding the hungry, healing the sick and raising the dead, the exact opposite of Darwinian methods.

Those learned theologians who argue God used millions of years of death, disease and struggle to bring living things into existence, do nothing more than grossly insult the Creator and will pay for it dearly on the day when we are all judged by His word and not by the standards of Darwin or Dawkins . (Ref. theistic evolution, Scriptures, Genesis, philosophy, worldview)

Evidence News, 16 December 2009

Charles Darwin was a bright young theological graduate, but by the end of his life he had turned his back on God, denied that Jesus Christ was the Son of God and declared Scripture to be "manifestly false". What happened?
Read the Creation Research article The Descent of a Man. PDF here

Darwin’s writings, including several editions of the Origin of Species and his many other books and articles which are available from The Complete Works of Charles Darwin

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