Quote: Darwin Becomes Lyell's Disciple

Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

Darwin becomes Lyell's disciple: During his time on the Beagle (1831 – 1836) Charles Darwin read lawyer Charles Lyell’s book Principles of Geology. After returning to Britain, Darwin wrote to a friend and colleague about the effect of Lyell’s writings on his own research and writing:

“I always feel as if my books came half out of Lyell’s brains and that I never acknowledge this sufficiently, nor do I know how I can, without saying so in so many words — for I have always thought that the great merit of the Principles [Principles of Geology] was that it altered the whole tone of one’s mind and therefore that when seeing a thing never seen by Lyell, one yet saw it partially through his eyes”
Letter to Leonard Horner, 29 Aug 1844.

Editorial Comment: It was only after Darwin took on Lyell’s world view of vast geologic ages that he could work out his own theory of evolutionary biology. Darwin’s own writings show the resulting descent from the student who had some respect for the God of the Bible into the man who fully denied Jesus Christ is the Son of God.
(Ref. theistic evolution, Scriptures, Genesis, philosophy, worldview)

Evidence News, 16 December 2009

Charles Darwin was a bright young theological graduate, but by the end of his life he had turned his back on God, denied that Jesus Christ was the Son of God and declared Scripture to be "manifestly false". What happened?
Read the Creation Research article The Descent of a Man. PDF here

Darwin’s letters are available from the Darwin Correspondence Project

q_and_a2
crc_youtube
outdoor_museum_panel
free_audio2