When Whales Walked the Earth

Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

"When whales walked the earth" proclaimed the cover of Nature, 20 Sep 2001, which featured two fossils that palaeontologists claim to be "archaic cetaceans," i.e. primitive whales. According to the report in Nature vol 413, p277, the two fossils are named Pakicetus attocki and Ichthyolestes pinfoldi and had skulls, leg bones and backbones similar in size and shape to land dwelling animals such as wolves and foxes. Prior to these findings Pakicetus was only known from fossilised teeth, jaws and one braincase. The teeth and ear bones were similar to those of whales. However, the new findings of backbone and limbs indicate the animals were well designed for running along the ground.

Editorial Comment: Whatever these creatures were, they were not whales. They were fully formed land dwelling creatures. Describing them as primitive whales is a triumph of ideology over observation by evolutionists who believe that mammals evolved on land but then have to explain why some mammals live in the sea.

q_and_a2
crc_youtube
outdoor_museum_panel
free_audio2