Rabbit Toothed Dinosaur Ate Plants

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Rabbit toothed dinosaur ate plants, according to a report in Nature, vol 419, p291, 19 September 2002. Chinese palaeontologists have found a small theropod dinosaur so strange the palaeontology editor of Nature suggests it should be called Looneytoonesaurus because it must have looked like a cross between Bugs Bunny and the Road Runner! (See Nature science update 19 September 2002.) The fossil has teeth similar to rabbits and other plant eating animals and has been given the scientific name Incisivosaurus because of its prominent incisors (front teeth). Theropods are the group of dinosaurs that include T. rex and Oviraptor and have always been regarded as meat eaters because most have sharp pointed teeth.

Scientists now realise this simplistic explanation of dinosaur diets needs revising. According to Washington University's (St Louis, US) Joshua Smith, (as reported on BBCNews 18 September 2002) "The classic view of predatory dinosaur teeth is that they are all basically the same and are shaped more or less like serrated steak knives. However, it is becoming more and more obvious as we begin to look closely at theropod teeth that they are far more complex than we have been led to believe, and that the steak-knife view isn't accurate."

Editorial Comment: Interesting that evolutionists are finally admitting what we have been saying for years sharp teeth don t necessarily mean their owner was a carnivore. Sharp teeth indicate the animal was good at ripping food. Sharp teeth don t tell you what that the food was.

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