No Human Rights for French Foetuses

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No human rights for French foetuses, according to an article in BBC News, 8 July 2004. In 1991 an appalling medical blunder in a French hospital resulted in the unborn baby of Mrs Thi-Nho Vo, a Frenchwoman of Vietnamese origin, being aborted in the sixth month of her pregnancy. Mrs Vo claimed that the doctor who carried out the abortion should be charged with "unintentional homicide" under French law because she believed her baby was a human being. A long legal battle culminated in a hearing at the European Court of Human Rights where Mrs Vo claimed her foetus should be protected by Article 2 of the European Convention on Human Rights, which guarantees a right to life. However, the court ruled against her, to the great delight of pro-abortion campaigners, who realised that abortion laws in European countries, which allow abortions up to 24 weeks, would be invalidated if the judgement went in Mrs Vo’s favour.

Editorial Comment: While lawyers are finding new ways of denying that unborn babies are human, scientists are finding more evidence of how every unborn baby is a unique human being. France is officially a secular society, but any society that throws God out, eventually throws out humanity. Why? The only reason human beings of any age have any rights is because man alone is made in the image of God. When vulnerable human beings of any kind are re-defined as not being human, the inevitable result is holocaust. (Ref. abortion, human, foetus)

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