Jurassic Beaver Swam With Dinosaurs

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Jurassic beaver swam with dinosaurs according to articles in BBC News and news@nature and Science vol 311, p1123, 24 February 2006. A team of palaeontologists led by Zhe-xi Luo of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, have found a fossil of a beaver-like animal in rocks from China. The fossil is about half a metre long and is an almost complete skeleton surrounded by impressions of fur and a broad scaly tail. The shape of its feet indicate it was a good swimmer. It has been dated as 164 million years old, which places it in the Middle Jurassic period – a time when the only mammals were believed to be small, insect eating creatures who spent their time avoiding being trampled by enormous dinosaurs, and which didn’t diversify into the variety of mammals we have now until the reptilian monsters died out. According to news@nature this new fossil "shows a hitherto unexpected diversity in the shape and size of the earliest mammal."

BBC

Editorial Comment: Diversity in shape and size of so called early mammals may be unexpected by evolutionists, but it is no surprise to Creation Research. Genesis 1:26-31 tells that the different kinds of mammals were separately created at the same time as the reptiles. Therefore, mammals of diverse shapes and sizes lived with dinosaurs from the beginning. If you are willing to think laterally, the fossils that are found in a rock layer indicate how and where the creatures got buried, not when, or even where, they lived. The fact that not many mammals have been found in rock layers containing dinosaurs is not evidence that mammals evolved later. (Ref. palaeontology, biodiversity)

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